The William H. Miner

Agricultural Research Institute

Miner Institute
Farm Report

FROM THE PRESIDENT’S DESK: UNDERSTOCKING?

Recently, a question from a Canadian veterinarian caught my attention because it is never heard in the U.S.: “What is the most economical level of understocking for a dairy herd?” Obviously I thought it had to be a typo – no one ever considers understocking their pens! read more

ALUMNI CORNER: EFFECT OF 'FRACKING' ON GROUNDWATER

Last month I was stuck in a traffic jam in Montrose, Pennsylvania - a town boasting a population of 1,600 people. This wasn’t your typical Chazy, NY traffic jam where one tractor can hold up a mile-long line of cars. Instead, the roads were clogged with 18-wheelers hauling drill rigs, diesel powered pumps, water tanks, and sand. read more

GOT BUTYRIC? WHY THE STINKY STUFF SHOULD BE AVOIDED

Maintaining maximum forage quality is a primary goal of any farm when ensiling and feeding forage. Fermentation allows for the nutrient content of the forage to be preserved to optimize cow performance and minimize dry matter loss. When fermentation occurs in an anaerobic environment, microbes feed on the sugar and other soluble carbohydrates that are present in the forage. read more

CANOLA MEAL & HIGH PROTEIN DDG
TO HIGH PRODUCING DAIRY COWS

Canola meal (CM) and high protein dried distillers grains (HPDDG) are relatively less expensive protein feeds compared to soybean meal (SBM) on a per ton basis, appearing to be a good buy. Though when comparing these products on cost per pound of protein or energy, these feeds tend to be similar in value. read more

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TIME FOR A SILAGE PROCESSOR CHECK-UP

It may still be August but the idea is to have your corn harvest equipment repaired and adjusted before it’s time to chop in case you need to make repairs and /or order parts. read more

SNEAKY PASTURE WEEDS: SEDGES AND RUSHES

We’ve discussed pasture grasses, legumes, pasture weeds and management ideas for pasture improvement on these pages many times before. All good topics. When you call to mind pasture weeds though, I’d bet you picture milkweed, goldenrod, a couple different types of thistles and maybe bedstraw. read more

MINER PRESENTS RESEARCH AT JAM 2014

In July I attended the Joint Annual Meeting (JAM) of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science held in Kansas City. It is one of my favorite meetings to attend during the year. read more

PHOSPHORUS MANAGEMENT RESEARCH

Maintaining optimum levels of soil phosphorus (P) is a vital part of an overall fertility/nutrient management plan for any farm. Equally important for larger livestock farms and farms in sensitive watersheds is minimizing losses of P to water, particularly in the Lake Champlain Basin and other sensitive watersheds used for drinking water. read more

WHAT'S HAPPENING ON THE FARM

In mid-August, our dairy management intern, Ashleigh Covert, will be leaving us, moving on to a job with NorthStar Cooperative in Michigan. As Ashleigh leaves we are looking for another intern – a motivated college graduate who is interested in gaining hands-on experience on our dairy farm. read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Closing Comment

You can’t divorce yourself from reality if you were never married to it in the first place.

 

The Miner Institute Farm Report is written primarily for farmers and other agricultural professionals in the Northeastern U.S. and Eastern Canada. Most articles deal with dairy and crops topics, but also included are articles dealing with environmental issues and global agriculture as well as editorial commentary.

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The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute
1034 Miner Farm Road, P.O. Box 90
Chazy, NY 12921
phone: 518-846-7121
fax: 518-846-8445