The William H. Miner

Agricultural Research Institute

Miner Institute
Farm Report

April Farm Report

FROM THE PRESIDENT’S DESK: EXERCISE FOR DAIRY COWS

It looks as if we’ll have an old-fashioned spring this year in Northern New York: Too much mud season, cold days that last far too long into March, and weather that changes on a dime. read more

ALUMNI CORNER: FARMING WITH KNOWLEDGE AND TECHNOLOGY

Many components of our society are going through an information technology revolution. The ability to accurately gather, process and present large amounts of data from various sources gives us insight read more

WHAT IS THE OPTIMAL SITE FOR STARCH DIGESTION?

What is the ideal site for most starch digestion? Is it the rumen or the small intestine? This topic has been debated by ruminant nutritionists for many years. It’s long been known that ruminally fermentable carbohydrates such as starch drive microbial protein synthesis when balanced with ruminally degradable protein. read more

RUMEN PAPILLAE ADAPT DURING TRANSITION PERIOD

Dietary strategies used during the transition period to optimize milk production and health in early lactation dairy cows continue to evolve. Traditionally, a “steam-up” dietary approach was used in dry cows to provide additional energy in the form of fermentable carbohydrate when dry matter intake typically declined before calving by up to 30%. read more

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WHAT'S HAPPENING ON THE FARM

Our cows are finally coming back in milk after a big drop in production when we hit some poor quality forages in the bunks. Haylage was lower in protein and higher in fiber than we expected. read more

7 SCR PROFILES OF COWS TO IDENTIFY IN YOUR HERD

The SCR HR tag is a great tool for producers to monitor cow health and reproductive status through rumination, and activity. The dataflow software translates cow data into simple and straightforward reports and graphs that allow a producer to accurately identify cows that need attention. read more

CONSUMER MISPERCEPTION IS
AGRICULTURE'S GREATEST OBSTACLE

In 1900, 41% of the US workforce was involved in agriculture. In 2014, less than 2% of Americans are farmers or ranchers. In the last 100 years, consumers migrated to urban areas, increasing their social and physical distance from farming communities. read more

FORAGE QUALITY, NDFD AND SPOILAGE

Last month’s article from the Forage Lab discussed the effects of frost and fungal growth depressing NDF digestibility (NDFD), thereby increasing undigestible NDF (uNDF). read more

COWLICKS AN INDICATOR OF ATTITUDE?

It’s hypotheWouldn’t it be nice to be able to look at a calf and predict how it will fit into your herd in the future or how easily it might be trained to lead as a 4-H show heifer? Looking at the facial hair whorl, technically known as a trichoglyph, may be an easy visual indicator of cow temperament, reaction to novel environments, and even breeding soundness. read more

SOIL WATER BUDGETS

Weather is generally the single most important factor affecting crop yield variability in a given year, largely due to changes in soil moisture during the growing season. In regions like the Northeast, moisture is rarely limiting in the spring. read more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Closing Comment

Optimism has no inhibitions that are based on past experience.

 

The Miner Institute Farm Report is written primarily for farmers and other agricultural professionals in the Northeastern U.S. and Eastern Canada. Most articles deal with dairy and crops topics, but also included are articles dealing with environmental issues and global agriculture as well as editorial commentary.

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The William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute
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Chazy, NY 12921
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